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September 11th, 2014

MobileGeneral_Sep08_AWhen you go to upgrade your phone you may consider selling your old one. However, one issue you may face is having a number of apps on your device that contain personal information. You need to take care that you deauthenticate apps when you're considering getting rid of, or selling your upgraded devices. The next question is which apps should you be looking out for?

What exactly is deauthentication?

Some apps, although not all, require that you authenticate your device in order for them to work. Many developers who ask users to authenticate their device do so in order to either prevent copies of the software from being created and utilized, or to ensure that the device and app can communicate securely.

Some examples of apps that ask for authentication include those that use multi-factor authentication, password managers, and apps that require a subscription or credit card information, etc. On some devices you even need to enter a code or key, much like installing software on a new computer, in order to activate all the features of the app.

The main reason many developers require authentication is connected to security. As security is becoming an ever more pressing issue, there is a good chance that we will see more apps asking users to authenticate their devices in the future.

The issue with this is that when you go to sell your device you will likely need to purchase the app again or the buyer of the device won't be able to set up their own account.

Common apps you should deauthenticate

Apps with subscription services: This includes apps like Google Play Music, Spotify, Office for iPad, cloud storage apps that you have linked your device to, etc. These apps are usually either linked with your device or your phone number so it is a good idea to deauthenticate them.
  1. Kindle app: The Kindle app is actually linked to your device and users who want to use the app will likely not be able to if the device is linked to your account. You can unlink devices by going to the Amazon site, logging in and selecting Manage your Content and Devices when you hover over your account name.
  2. Password management apps: These apps usually require that you authenticate your device to use a particular service. If you try to log in on a new device, these apps may not work properly.
  3. Chat apps: Some chat apps like WhatsApp or Line require that you register for the service using your phone number. If you are keeping your number, you shouldn't have to deauthenticate, but if you are getting a new number, you should go into the account settings of each app and unlink your number. WhatsApp for example has a feature that allows you to move your number to a new device.
  4. Any app or service that you have linked credit card information to: While you ordinarily don't have to physically deauthenticate these apps, as the information is usually linked to an account and password, it is a good idea to unlink your credit card with any app on your phone before you hand it over. This will help ensure that credit card information is not stored or accessible.
When it comes to the major app stores, e.g., Windows Phone Store, Google Play, and iTunes, you will often see that your device has been linked to your account. If you are going to sell your device, the best course of action is to reset using the factory reset option. This will delete all data and installed apps on the device. This will often be enough to deauthenticate all apps.

If you are looking to learn more about getting rid of your older devices, contact us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 5th, 2014

It’s an IT dilemma facing authorities, parents, and it’s a part of the continuing national debate about parental responsibilities: how do health care providers limit online portals what parents – that’s right, parents – can’t see of their children’s health records?

It’s a legal and regulatory minefield for those in charge of managing and protecting information. The minefield is growing with the increasing popularity of online patient portals.

While parents have the responsibility of raising their children, they don’t have the right to see all of their children’s health information. Laws from the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) to state laws and rules apply confidentiality to various children’s health records.

In a 2008 study in “Online Research Journal, Perspectives in Health Information Management,” focus groups of teens and adults explored the issue of online portals as a way of accessing health information.

This finding was perhaps predictable: “Teens in general felt that it was their decision whether or not to sign up for the portal and they should not need their parents’ approval. Not surprisingly, parents felt they should have to provide consent for their teens to use the teen patient portal.” (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2556441/).

On top of that, laws vary from state to state. In Tennessee, for example, a teenager must have his or her parents’ consent to get a tattoo, but a pregnant teen-ager can receive pregnancy tests and prenatal care without a parent’s knowledge: http://www.state.tn.us/tenncare/tenndercare/teenrights.pdf

In California, under that state’s confidentiality requirements: “…parents do not have an absolute right to see their child’s records. Under state law, providers may refuse to provide parents or guardians access to a minor’s medical records when ‘the health care provider determines that access to the patent records requested by the (parent or guardian) would have a detrimental effect on the provider’s professional relationship with the minor patient or the minor’s physical safety or psychological well-being.” (http://www.teenhealthlaw.org/fileadmin/teenhealth/teenhealthrights/ca/Ca-ParentAccessRules.pdf).

On the one hand parents are told to be involved in their child’s life, be aware of what their child is doing, and be active in monitoring their behavior. On the other hand they’re restricted from access to significant areas of their children’s health information.

That’s a debate for in which the country and its leaders will have to engage. For IT professionals in the health field, it creates a host of complexities. How do you create an online portal for ease of patient access to medical records, but make sure that parents don’t have access to specific, individual records?

  •  No national standards or definitive guidance exists in this arena. Thus, it’s sort of a “you can try that but if it doesn’t work you’re in trouble” situation.

 

  • The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT has put together what it calls a Privacy & Security Tiger Team “move forward on a range of privacy and security issues.”

 

  •  While the country awaits the team’s findings – assuming they’ll work – there are two options for health care providers:

1. work with an absolutely reputable and capable IT provider who can develop the best possible protections for your organization.

2. tread carefully in the minefield.

September 4th, 2014

Hardware_Sep02_AYou undoubtedly use computer monitors daily, whether at work, at home or both. So, you know that they are available in a variety of shapes, designs, and colors. What a lot of people might not know is, based on the technology used to make them, they can be broadly categorized into three types commonly used today.

CRT (cathode ray tube) monitors

These monitors employ CRT technology, which was used most commonly in the manufacturing of television screens. With these monitors, a stream of intense high energy electrons is used to form images on a fluorescent screen. A cathode ray tube is basically a vacuum tube containing an electron gun at one end and a fluorescent screen at another end.

While CRT monitors can still be found in some organizations, many offices have stopped using them largely because they are heavy, bulky, and costly to replace should they break. While they are still in use, it would be a good idea to phase these monitors out for cheaper, lighter, and more reliable monitors.

LCD (liquid crystal display) monitors

The LCD monitor incorporates one of the most advanced technologies available today. Typically, it consists of a layer of color or monochrome pixels arranged schematically between a couple of transparent electrodes and two polarizing filters. Optical effect is made possible by polarizing the light in varied amounts and making it pass through the liquid crystal layer. The two types of LCD technology available are the active matrix of TFT and a passive matrix technology. TFT generates better picture quality and is more secure and reliable. Passive matrix, on the other hand, has a slow response time and is slowly becoming outdated.

The advantages of LCD monitors include their compact size which makes them lightweight. They also don't consume much electricity as CRT monitors, and can be run off of batteries which makes them ideal for laptops.

Images transmitted by these monitors don’t get geometrically distorted and have little flicker. However, this type of monitor does have disadvantages, such as its relatively high price, an image quality which is not constant when viewed from different angles, and a monitor resolution that is not always constant, meaning any alterations can result in reduced performance.

LED (light-emitting diodes) monitors

LED monitors are the latest types of monitors on the market today. These are flat panel, or slightly curved displays which make use of light-emitting diodes for back-lighting, instead of cold cathode fluorescent (CCFL) back-lighting used in LCDs. LED monitors are said to use much lesser power than CRT and LCD and are considered far more environmentally friendly.

The advantages of LED monitors are that they produce images with higher contrast, have less negative environmental impact when disposed, are more durable than CRT or LCD monitors, and features a very thin design. They also don’t produce much heat while running. The only downside is that they can be more expensive, especially for the high-end monitors like the new curved displays that are being released.

Being aware of the different types of computer monitors available should help you choose one that’s most suited to your needs. Looking to learn more about hardware in today’s world? Contact us and see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Hardware
September 3rd, 2014

BCP_Sep02_AMany people wonder why it’s necessary to perform business impact analysis (BIA) when they’ve already invested a large amount of time on a risk assessment. The answer is simple: because the purpose of a BIA is different, and wrong results could incur unnecessary expenses or create inadequate business continuity strategies. To that end, let’s take a look at five tips for successful business impact analysis.

Five tips for successful business impact analysis:

  1. Treat it as a (mini) project: Define the person responsible for BIA implementation and their authority. You should also define the scope, objective, and time frame in which it should be implemented.
  2. Prepare a good questionnaire: A well structured questionnaire will save you a lot of time and will lead to more accurate results. For example: BS (British standard) 25999-1 and BS 2599902 standards will provide you with a fairly good idea about what your questionnaire should contain. Identifying impacts resulting from disruptions, determining how these vary over time, and identifying resources needed for recovery are often covered in this. It’s also good practice to use both qualitative and quantitative questions to identify impacts.
  3. Define clear criteria: If you’re planning for interviewees to answer questions by assigning values, for instance from one to five, be sure to explain exactly what each of the five marks mean. It’s not uncommon that the same event is evaluated as catastrophic by lower-level employees while top management personnel assess the same event as having a more moderate impact.
  4. Collect data through human interaction: The best way to collect data is when someone skilled in business continuity performs an interview with those responsible for critical activity. This way lots of unresolved questions are cleared up and well-balanced answers are achieved. If interviews are not feasible, do at least one workshop where all participants can ask everything that is concerning them. Avoid the shortcut of simply sending out questionnaires.
  5. Determine the recovery time objectives only after you have identified all the interdependencies: For example, through the questionnaire you might conclude that for critical activity A the maximum tolerable period of disruption is two days; however, the maximum tolerable period of disruption for critical activity B is one day and it cannot recover without the help of critical activity A. This means that the recovery time objective for A will be one day instead of two days.
More often than not, the results of BIA are unexpected and the recovery time objective is longer than it was initially thought. Still, it’s the most effective way to get you thinking and preparing for the issues that could strike your business. When you are carrying out BIA make sure you put in the effort and hours to do it right. Looking to learn more about business continuity? Contact us today.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

August 27th, 2014

socialmedia_Aug26_AHave you ever looked at images and visuals posted by businesses and users on Instagram? While many users take photos using their mobile devices, there are many images that simply look way too good to be taken with a phone camera, especially the ones without filters. Many business owners want to know how they too can take quality images like these too.

The truth behind some of Instagram's best images

Those awesome Instagram photos we see aren't always taken using mobile phones. Instead, many users use digital cameras which offer much better image quality. You can capture some amazing shots with a higher end DSLR cameras with multiple lenses.

If you have one of these cameras and are looking to create high-quality images for Instagram, or any other social media site, you may be slightly confused as to how to get the images onto the platform - especially since many of us use this via the mobile app. To make uploading a little easier, here is a brief guide detailing how to get images from your digital camera onto Instagram.

1. Transfer and process images

Once you have taken photos with your camera, you will need to get them off of your camera's memory and onto your computer's hard drive. Most camera's have apps that allow you to do this, so be sure to follow the instructions in the app that came with it.

When your images have been transferred to your computer, you are likely going to want to process them a little bit. This is especially true if you have a DSLR or other high-end point-and-shoot which takes RAW images. These can be quite large and are not compatible with Instagram.

Most images taken with a camera are quite large in size, so you are going to need to use an image editing program like Adobe Photoshop, or free tools like Pixlr to process them. What you are looking to do is to crop your images so that they are square.

If you are used to the advanced photo editing features, then do your edits before cropping. When you crop your images you should crop or resize them so that they are 640X640 pixels. This is the size of all images taken using Instagram's camera app.

Also, be sure to save the images as JPEGs, as this is the image format used by most smartphone cameras.

2. Save processed images in their own folder

It helps to create a folder somewhere on your hard drive (we recommend in the same folder where you save all of your other folders) that is specifically for images you want to post on Instagram.

When you have processed and edited the images to your liking, save the images here. Try using an easy to use file name like the date and a letter or note so you can easily tell which images are which, so you know which to use.

3. Move the images to your device

You can move images using the cloud or by manually transferring the images to your phone. If you decide to manually transfer your files, you will need to plug your device into your computer.

For users with iPhones, you can open iTunes and click on your device followed by Photos. Then select the box beside Sync photos from. Select the file you created in the step above and then Sync to transfer the images over.

For users with Android devices, plug your phone into the computer and drag the folder you created in the step above into the Photos folder of your Android device.

For Windows Phone users, plug your device into your computer and open My Computer on your desktop. You should see your device listed in the window that opens. Open the file system for your device and drag the image files you created above into the Photos folder of your phone.

If you choose to use the cloud to transfer your files, use the operating system's cloud (e.g., iCloud, Google Drive, or OneDrive) to upload the files. Just be sure to use the same account as the one on your phone.

4. Add images to Instagram

Once the photos are either on your device, or in the cloud, you can now upload them to Instagram. This can be done by:
  1. Opening the app and tapping on the camera icon.
  2. Tapping on the button in the bottom left of the screen.
  3. Selecting where the image is located on your device. E.g., the Gallery app if you placed the photos in your phone's hard drive, or the cloud service you used.
  4. Editing them as you see fit.
Once this is complete, you should be able to post your images as you usually do with any other Instagram image on your phone. Take the time to add filters, and hashtags as well as a good description before you post.

If you would like to learn more about using Instagram to share your images then get in touch and we will show you the advantages of the bigger picture.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Social Media
August 22nd, 2014

Productivity_Aug18_AThese days many of us have integrated various apps and programs on our computers and mobile devices into our daily lives. The problem many of us face, however, is that apps and programs are all different and many don't work all that well together, so we need to take time to transfer information or even share the same content. To make things easier, there is a great app called If This Then That (IFTTT), that could help make your devices just that much smarter.

What is If This Then That?

IFTTT is a Web and mobile app that was developed to connect different Web apps like Google Apps, DropBox, Facebook, Instagram, etc, together into one general system. In general, the service runs on conditional statements - or recipes - that fit the IFTTT statement.

The service is set up on a number of different conditional statements that make up what the developers of the app call a recipe. Each recipe is broken down into two different sections:

  • This - Also referred to as a trigger. Each trigger in a recipe is kind of like a requirement in that the set trigger has to happen for the recipe to start working.
  • That - That refers to an action that happens when a 'this' condition is triggered.
Once you have set up a number of recipes, the app runs in the background to check for triggers and then will automatically execute the action when it notices a trigger.

Examples of IFTTT recipes

There are a wide variety of recipes out there that you can create. For example, some of the more useful IFTTT recipes for businesses include:
  • If a photo is posted on the business Instagram account, then it is shared with Twitter and Facebook.
  • If a Square payment is processed, then this creates a line in a specific spreadsheet.
  • If a contact is added to a phone's address book, then this information is placed on Evernote.
  • If an article is posted on a specific blog, then the post is shared on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.
  • If an email is starred on Gmail, then a reminder is set on my phone to review starred emails.
  • If I enter the office, then my phone is muted.
  • If a client emails an attachment, then a copy is saved to DropBox.
  • If my device is in the office, then my office lights are turned on (if you have Phillips Hue bulbs).
There are a wide variety of supported apps that allow you to create recipes for nearly anything you can think of. The developers are constantly adding support for new channels (apps), including many from the Internet of Things.

How to sign up for this

Because you can access IFTTT from the Web and via an app on your mobile device, we recommend first thinking about how you are going to use it. If you are going to be using recipes for your mobile device, then we recommend downloading the app onto your device. Regardless of how you are going to use it, you can create an account by:
  1. Going to the IFTTT website (https://ifttt.com/)
  2. Clicking Join IFTTT.
  3. Setting a username and password and clicking Create account.
From there, you will be able to log in and start creating rules. If you do want to use your mobile device, you should then download the free app for your device - Windows Phone, Android, iPhone - and then log in using the account information you just created. When you first log in you should see a number of channels (apps) related to your system have been activated. This means you can now start creating recipes.

Creating recipes from your browser

  1. Go to the IFTTT website (https://ifttt.com/) and press Sign in.
  2. Press Create.
  3. Press This and select your trigger - try picking your app first, then click on it to get a list of actions.
  4. Press Create Trigger.
  5. Click That and select an action channel.
  6. Select Create Recipe.
You can also click Browse from the menu bar at the top to find and activate already created recipes.

Creating recipes from your mobile device

  1. Open the app.
  2. Press the mortar and pestle icon at the top-right.
  3. Press the + followed by the + besides If on the next screen.
  4. Select the app from the icons at the top of the screen, and select the related trigger.
  5. Tap the + beside Then and select an action or app.
  6. Press Finish to activate the new recipe.
If you are looking for a cool way to connect different apps, and even save yourself time, then this could be something worth looking into. And, if you are looking to learn more about how you can increase your productivity, contact us today to see how our systems can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Productivity
August 22nd, 2014

Businesses across America – and the world – face an ever-evolving technological threat of ransom demands, as in, “Pay me or you’ll never see your computer data alive again.”

It’s called “ransomware.” If you can avoid ransomware, you’re ahead of the game. If you don’t, and ransomware strikes, your data recovery should be treated as a disaster recovery situation.

One of ransomware’s latest forms is called Cryptowall, which encrypts your computer files with a sophisticated encryption or blocks access and use. The victim is told to pay a ransom, usually either a prepaid cash voucher or Bitcoin, and is given a limited time to produce payment.

But that’s just one type of ransomware. In June, some 600,000 to 650,000 Dominos Pizza French and Belgian customers had personal information (names, addresses, passwords, phone numbers, etc.) hijacked by hackers, who then demanded a 30,000-euro ransom from Dominos or the customers’ personal data would be released on the internet. Dominos didn’t pay. The information hasn’t been released. Yet.

These malicious attacks often come in the usual way, by opening an e-mail attachment or downloading a file which then infects the computer system. The larger the number of computers and users in your network, the greater the possibility that ransomware can, or will, affect you.

The FBI urges businesses to be “especially wary of unexpected email from postal/package services and dispute notifications,” and a July 23 article in the Arizona Republic described how complex these delivery systems have become: “Some people are being infected because they got what appeared to be a voice message or fax transmission via Dropbox, a very popular file sharing service.

“Others are being attacked by infected ads on legitimate sites also known as “malvertising” (malicious advertising).

“Many legitimate companies that sell advertising on their sites have been found to be serving up rigged ads without knowing it.”

Even when companies produce the ransom, there’s no guarantee that the release key will be provided and the file unlocked.

Ransomware is like any virus, malware, or other attack: the bad guys are always working on new versions and variations. It puts a premium on being up to date with your defenses. It’s not right or fair, but it’s reality. .

What to do, now? Here are several suggestions

  • Ensure your security software – and your software in total – are the latest versions. Older software has older protections, and the newest ransomware has a vastly better chance of infiltrating your systems.
  • Use multiple defensive data security systems, platforms, and levels.
  • If you become ransomware infected, try using your computer’s system restore to take your system back to a point before the ransomware struck.
  • Moving data to high security cloud sites, such as Google, (name others).
  • Make sure you’re blocking .exe files from being introduced via e-mail or through zip files.

There are a great many websites with suggestions about how to avoid or recover from ransomware, but you’ll probably find professional, personal-to-your-situation advice best. If you have an IT provider, don’t put off this conversation. If you don’t have an IT provider, and would like to talk about ransomware protection with The IT Company, please contact us at 865-392-9200.

Whatever you choose, don’t wait. Ransomware is dangerous and expensive.

                 

August 7th, 2014

Hardware_Aug05_ALaptops are one of the most useful tools at a business owner's disposal. These highly mobile devices allow you to take your work out of the office, or even just away from your desk. However, mobile as they are they still rely on batteries. The problem with some laptops however is that batteries don't last overly long, and there may be times when you aren't near a power source and find your battery running low. If you find yourself in this situation, here are six tips that can help preserve battery life until you find a power source.

1. Adjust the brightness of your screen

A brighter screen will cause your battery life to decrease faster. If you are running low on power, try turning the brightness of the screen down as low as it can go while still remaining visible.

Many laptops, including most PCs and all Macs, have shortcuts on the keyboard that allow you to modify the brightness of your screen. On almost all laptops, screen brightness is indicated by a sun icon, and pressing the smaller sun will decrease the brightness. On most laptops you can either just press the key with the brightness labels on it to decrease the brightness, while others will require that you press the FN key and the key with the label.

2. Activate your laptop's battery saver mode

Most laptops have a built in battery management feature that allows you to enable different profiles based on how you are using the laptop. One of the more useful settings is Battery Saver or Eco Mode. These modes have been developed to help extend the battery life when your battery is running low.

When activated, they will often manually override settings like screen brightness and turn off unnecessary services or connections like BlueTooth. To activate this on PCs, you can usually click on the battery icon in the lower-right bar of the main Windows screen and select your power saving mode.

If you have a Mac, press the battery icon at the top and select Open Energy Saver Preferences. This will allow you to modify how your laptop saves energy, including when to turn the screen and hard drives off.

3. Unplug connected devices

Many USB devices you plug into your laptop like hard drives, mice, phones, etc. are actually powered by your computer. Therefore, if you are running off of the battery, you will likely see increased drain if devices are plugged in.

When you are running low on power, try unplugging devices connected by USB. This is especially important if you have plugged your mobile phone or tablet into your laptop to charge.

You should also look to make sure other connection methods like Bluetooth are off. Disconnecting devices should allow your laptop to last a bit longer.

4. Turn off keyboard backlighting

A common feature of many newer laptops is a backlit keyboard. While useful when you are in a low light situation and need to see what keys you are hitting, the backlight does use battery power and can decrease your battery life.

Most laptops allow you to turn the backlight off from the keyboard, much like the screen brightness. The location of these buttons will be different for each laptop, so be sure to consult your user manual if you can't find them.

5. Close unnecessary apps

When working on the computer, many of us will have more than one program open at the same time. Some of these programs aren't 100% necessary to the task at hand, and keeping them open will usually increase the drain on battery.

So, when your battery starts to get low, try closing apps and programs you aren't using. This is especially true for apps that require larger amounts of computer resources like Photoshop or any graphics heavy program. Closing these will give you a precious few extra minutes, or more, of power.

6. Simplify your activities

Finally, along with closing apps that you aren't using, try simplifying what you are doing. What we mean here is focus on one task. If you are writing a blog article, close everything not related to writing including communication apps like email, instant messaging, etc.

The goal here is to try and stay in the same window or program, as switching programs will increase the drain of the battery. Sure, it won't be a massive spike in battery usage, but staying in the same window or app will help increase the time you'll be able to use your laptop on battery.

If you have a laptop and are looking for ways to get more out of your battery, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Hardware
August 6th, 2014

BCP_Aug05_AMany businesses are constantly facing a potential disaster. It could be a major fire that wipes out your business, or something as simple as accidentally deleting an important spreadsheet. Regardless of the severity of the potential disaster, businesses need to be prepared and one of the best ways to prepare is to back up your data. In the first part of this article we covered four tips that can help. In this article, we take a look at the next four tips to help ensure your data is backed up.

5. Automate your backup

It can be tough to actually remember to back up your files, especially if your business is busy. Therefore, you could look into an automated backup solution. At the very least, you should set a schedule as to when backups are conducted and set what is being backed up. While this isn't a full automation, a schedule will help.

If you are using solutions like the cloud or NAS (Network Attached Storage), you can usually automate the process by selecting which files and folders to back up and when. The software that powers these solutions will then do this automatically.

Ideally, your backups should be carried out automatically to ensure your data is available should you need it. But you should check periodically to ensure that your data is actually being backed up. This is especially true if you are backing up other systems, as there have been cases where employees have become frustrated by the backup process and simply turned it off. The business owner, thinking their data was being backed up would be in for a bit of a shock when systems crashed, if this was the case.

6. Back up your backups

Redundancy of your backups is just as important as actually backing up your data. You should keep a backup of your backup in case something happens to your original backup. While this doesn't have to be carried out as often as the 'normal' backup, this should be done on a regular basis.

In order to really ensure backup redundancy we recommend that if your main backup is kept on-site, then the secondary backup should be on another storage medium that is kept off-site.

7. Don't forget data stored on non-physical drives

What we are referring to here is the data stored on different services like your email, social media, and non-physical locations. This is especially true if you say have you own servers. It's highly likely that there is data stored on these services as well, and should they go down and you haven't kept a backup, you may lose important information.

Essentially, think about critical data that is used in the company, but isn't physically kept on computers. It may feel like this is going a step too far with backups, especially for businesses who use email services like Exchange and Gmail. However, while the chances of these systems going down are incredibly rare, it could still happen. Therefore, you should conduct a monthly to bi-yearly backup just to ensure that data is there somewhere should something happen.

8. Test your backups

Finally, it is beneficial to actually test your backups from time-to-time to ensure that they are not only working but the data is actually recoverable. If you do a trial run on recovering your data, you can get a good idea of how long it will take to retrieve this information when you actually need to recover it. You can then take steps to optimize this and let the relevant people know.

Also, testing is a good way to discover any problems, e.g., if someone has disabled backups, or one solution isn't working. This will ensure that your data is there when you need it.

If you are looking to integrate a data backup solution, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

July 30th, 2014

SocialMedia_July28_AOne of the main ideas behind LinkedIn is that the network is a virtual venue for people to share their thoughts, ideas, and observances with other like-minded users. Earlier this year the company introduced a new feature to their platform that allowed a select few users to create blog posts directly on LinkedIn. Now, the company has decided to open this up to all LinkedIn members.

About LinkedIn's new publishing platform

Like other social networks, LinkedIn allows users to publish posts on their profile which are then visible to other users. In the past, there was a limit as to how long the posts could be, which influenced how users shared the content they generated. Most would simply copy and paste a link to their content into a post on their LinkedIn profile.

In an effort to make sharing thoughts, ideas, expertise, etc. easier, LinkedIn has implemented the long-form post. This feature allows you to create longer content, such as blog articles and opinion pieces, and post this directly on LinkedIn. In other words, you can now use LinkedIn as a blog which is shared with your connections.

If you create long-form content, this could be a useful way to get posts out to an even wider audience than through your blog. This is because when you publish a post on LinkedIn, it becomes part of your overall profile, with the post being visible under the Posts section of your profile. New long-form posts will also be published and shared with all of your contacts automatically.

This means that you could technically increase the overall reach of your content, especially if the content you produce is useful to your LinkedIn connections.

Writing long-form content on LinkedIn

If you would like to start publishing long-form content using your LinkedIn profile, you should be able to do so by:
  1. Logging into your LinkedIn profile.
  2. Pressing the pencil in the box that says Share an update…
Note: This update is still rolling out to users, so you may not be able to produce long-form content just yet. If you don't see the pencil in the Share an update… box, you will need to wait for a few weeks, or until you get an email from LinkedIn saying the feature is ready for you to use.

If you do see the pencil icon, click on it to open the long-form post screen. It looks like most other Web-based publishing and writing platforms with the usual formatting buttons and text field where you input the content.

You can write your article directly on this page, but many choose to write using a program they are comfortable with and then copy and paste into the text field. If you want to add images to your post, you can simply click where you would like the image to slot into the content and select the camera icon from the menu bar above the text field. Select the image and hit Submit. You can then resize the image by clicking and dragging on it.

Saving and editing your content

Once you have finished writing we strongly recommend you hit the Save button at the bottom of the text field. This will save the content to your profile, but will not post it. This means you can edit the content before publishing. To do this, click on Preview which will open your post in another window, allowing you to see what the post will look like on your profile.

While in Preview mode, be sure to check the spelling and grammar, along with the overall formatting. If you spot anything that needs to be changed simply switch back to the editing tab on your browser and make any amendments.

When you have finished writing, formatting, and editing you can then hit the Publish button. This will then publish the content on your profile and share it with your connections.

If you have content that you think your connections and colleagues would benefit from reading, then this new LinkedIn feature could prove to be useful and should be considered as a larger part of your overall content strategy.

Looking to learn more about LinkedIn and how you can leverage it in your business? Contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Social Media